Home Improvement and Interior

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Livia Land

Posts Tagged ‘plant’

How to Plant a Cutting Garden

Wednesday, April 6th, 2011
Garden

Grow a cutting garden and enjoy flowers indoors and out

If you feel guilty when you cut flowers in your garden, worrying that you’re destroying nature or leaving gaps in your flowerbeds, it may be time for you to plant a cutting garden, says the American Association of Nurserymen (AAN). A cutting garden is designed to provide flowers for indoor arrangements, and it will give you a new perspective on removing flowers from your garden.

Choosing the Right Flowers and Plants

As with any garden, the first step in planning your cutting garden is to select plants that grow well in your part of the country. Ask the experts at your local garden center for their suggestions, and keep in mind your soil conditions, the amount of sun or shade your garden receives and how much it rains.

Selecting a Color Scheme

After you’ve decided which plants will thrive at your site, choose a color scheme, whether bright and vivid primary colors, soft and muted pastel shades or dusty earth tones. Since the purpose of a cutting garden is to grow flowers to use indoors, think about how flowers of certain colors will look when you place them in main rooms of your house.

Finally, plant flowers and plants in such a way that no one will notice that you frequently forage for new material for your indoor bouquets. One way to achieve a continuously balanced look in your cutting garden is to group your plantings by color, so that when you clip several blue flowers one day and several yellow flowers another, the overall appearance of the garden is still one of continuity and growth.

You can also fill in around your flowers with shrubs and larger, bushy plants that can easily spare a few leaves or berries, as well as plant a mix of perennials, annuals and bulbs so your garden will bloom all year ’round.

This garden plants

Saturday, February 12th, 2011
Garden

If you approve of opportunities for you or your children gifts of the extended family to offer, or simply as gifts that are looking for a personal item to give them, then here’s a suggestion or two for you.

If you are looking for a gift for the gardener of the family or someone who has recently moved in her own home, someone in an apartment or a unit or a person who can not manage to field a full size, or a family member whom he loves, with fresh ingredients, etc. So why not consider giving them something to cook in the garden? Here I am on the plants you are talking about sharing your own garden plants.

There are many plants in the garden, the average may be divided or the course itself is layered. Where would you go along and have a pot of Article rooted they could, and with a little trim planter, creating a nice gift for someone you love.

These plants include many herbs and perennials or shrubs and even some trees that manage to send branches to self-release layers or the root system. Some perennials or bulbs increase in size or number of bulbs over time. Chance seedlings coming in the wrong place for you, can be used easily. All these offer the possibility to create a wonderful cost gift for someone else.

First, you have a number of pots with plastic ones go to the left of the entrance into the garden population, or someone you know, or you can go buy a plastic pot / ceramic / clay, etc. as needed. If the person you give the plant is not a real gardener, then you might think to take a pot with a water well to increase the soil to plant survival.

Then you need to start looking for your plant material to examine carefully around your garden on the ground level. Watch the plants show multiple stems growing from the floor. Or sprawling plants where a branch was based on the ground and took root along the branch, maybe one where a branch has become buried under the mulch.

Or where there is a sucker growing from the ground a short distance from the parent plant. Another possibility is seedlings growing in the garden of a distance from the parent plant material. Maybe there’s a bunch of plants or a big patch of bulbs, where you can make a division.

Many of these plants benefit from sharing or being allowed some more growing space in the particular area where you removed some of the material.

Different parts of Australia have a different number of plant species that have adapted to this form of self-propagation. If you can not find all the plants can be stored in your own garden, why not watch a friend or in the neighbors yard. Or you could maybe join forces and provide a joint presence with plants of another member of the family garden. Or another possibility is a plant in a pot that has several plants already established in their purchase.

Divide the half in front of you use in your own garden, and still have half to repot and give. Even if you are unsure of your gardening skills, you can always pick up plants at low prices on the market, the local church school fair / flea markets, etc. repot in a larger pot or more pleasant for a pretty cheap now.

Another option is multi-plant a few different plants in a long or large round tub. This garden will be an immediate transition. Some topics you might consider here is herbs, foliage indoors, bulbs, annuals, alpine / rock, cacti / succulents or even annual mix of patio and garden perennials.

It is the best on the ground around the plant you’ll be working very well before you do the border, as this will remove the maximum amount of root mass during the wet ground.

The first step is to divide the clump or cut the branch members at the plant separately. Then with a shovel to dig, fork or gardening trowel, so far from the plant potential as possible as this will be the largest root mass.

how far you think you need (this will depend on factors like the size of the new facility, the type of feedstock, type of soil, plants or landscaping materials to others around the area, etc.. ) As gently as possible to excavate the new facility. Shake off excess soil and fill the resulting hole in the ground if necessary.

Reduce the foliage of the new facility at approximately the same size of the root ball and tried to protect some of the growth of new leaves. Repot as soon as possible so the roots will wither and die.

Another thing to consider is the type of pot you are going to the plant if it is just a plastic pot, then you do not need to prepare before. However, if you look at the painting, that before digging.

When the paint pots, you have to want to stick to certain preparations for the right colors. plastic pots should be roughened surface with sand paper. While some terracotta pots must have a base coat to the outer surface before painting. Try not to finish or paint the inside of the pot, because if most usual, there are colors that chemicals which affect or contaminate the soil and plants over time included.

Other possibilities for decorating up pots are easy to pack paste on pieces such as stones, tiles, buttons, sticks, shells, jewels, ribbons, stickers and decals, etc. Other ways of decorating a pot for the first presentation the pot (not the actual work), or with wrapping paper, cellophane, material, a cloth or cheap burlap. Hold these wrappers in place with twine, ribbon, bandana, scarf, etc.

Other means to increase the value of the potted plant is growing information and name tags for the plant / s are included. Add other foibles, you must include a personalized name tag, (Hi, my name is David …), the Diffenbachia or little watering indicator, miniature hand tools, small amounts of fertilizers, ornamental pot, watering can, etc.

So as you can, creating a very personal gift to be easy for anyone within each range. Why not go into the garden and think about what you present for Christmas this weekend to prepare.

Interior Hydroponic Garden: With Clones For a Quick Start

Friday, February 4th, 2011
Garden

Clones or cuttings from your favorite plants is the best way to perpetuate their existence. It is also the best way to start up a hydroponic garden. For example, I had a very prolific plant Rosemary growing on my kitchen window. However, there was dirt and I really do not like dirt in the house. I took cuttings of health and ended up with three new clones, which I planted in a LECA (small balls of clay) mean in my hydroponic garden inside.

With a hydroponic garden, you can always fresh with new clones. You must never without an herb, flower or vegetable special that you really like, again and again. Here are some tips to get perfect lighting for your indoor hydroponic garden clones.

However, if you start planting, clones need daylight after rooting. It’s a good idea, with a low intensity and diffuse light from sources such as T-5 or T-8 fluorescent tubes to start. In the early days, the cuttings do best with only one or two 24 watt strip on top of standard 10 “x 20″ pan spread plants in your hydroponic garden inside. You can gradually increase the intensity a few days after lowering the lights near the dome of propagation. However, the temperature does not houseplants bit in your hydroponic garden to 85o increase CF/29o inside the dome, after this adjustment.

Once roots develop, you can change the HID lamps are primarily red and blue, growth stimulating spectra. metal halide lamps, grow lights should be used for vegetative phase of growth of plants in your hydroponic garden inside. metal halide lamps, rear light spectrum bright lights in the blue and white, which mimics effective to produce a typical summer day. Vapor lamps, high pressure sodium lamps, light emissions in the red spectrum, which mimics the angle of the sun in the fall produce. If your plants are ready to bloom, you must pass the metal halide grow lights, sodium vapor light of your high pressure in your hydroponic garden plants.

condition of your equipment to the bright light in your hydroponic garden plants by gradually decreasing the distance between plants and lights. After a few weeks should encourage your plants to be able to very bright light, this degree of healthy, robust and fast growing plants in your hydroponic garden inside handle.

A hydroponic garden are a source of great joy and astonishment of all, you started it and the fastest of clones or cuttings. As summer draws to a close, take cuttings from the garden and start new plants for your indoor hydroponic garden. Teach children what you do, and they can share the magic of the starting point for new plants for your hydroponics garden plants.

 

How to Start a Garden

Thursday, January 6th, 2011
Garden

How to Start a Garden

Planting a garden can be easier and more enjoyable with these gardening tips

Planting a garden, whether it is a vegetable plot or a flower bed, is an adventure where your creativity and patience are put to the test! You are directly responsible for the beautiful rose blooms or the delicious tomatoes that develop in this section of the land. Therefore to have the most success you need to determine where you plant!

The location of the garden should be determined by several factors: sunlight, soil conditions, water and wind exposure. Take notes on when this area of the yard is exposed to sunshine. This can determine which plants will thrive there. Test your soil to see if conditioners are needed to bring it up to optimum growing conditions. Pay attention to whether water collects in this section of the lawn. Some plants do well in soggy locations, but most need well-drained soil. Strong winds can dry out soil and plants, so try to locate the plot out of direct winds. Once you have determined where you will create your garden masterpiece you are ready to select plants!

Choose plants that will grow in your zone. Although you might have your heart set on a certain flower or vegetable, if your climate or garden location won’t support this choice, you will inevitably be disappointed. To avoid this, choose plants that are meant for your growing zone (ideally native plants), and disease-resistant and drought tolerant plants. Ask the employee at the nursery for assistance in selecting these. Be aware of the future size of each plant. A tree planted near a house will eventually provide shade, but it could also be a hazard during storms.

Plan out what flowering plants you would like for the seasons. Most perennials only bloom for a short time, so by mixing in some annuals there will be constant color in your garden. By having seasonal color you can change the look of your garden and create excitement and personality!

Now that you have your garden location selected and your plants purchased, you are ready to start digging! What tools are required to get things started? These include:

Rake: for seasonal cleanups and spreading/leveling soil

Trowel: for transplanting and weeding

Shovel: for digging, scooping, spreading compost and planting

Hoe: for chopping weeds and tilling soils

Pruners: for clipping flowers and pruning trees

Garden Gloves: for protecting your hands from blisters and dirt

Garden Hose: invest in a top-of-the-line hose that will resist kinking, is flexible and coils easily. Invest in high quality tools. They will last longer and are more durable than their cheaper counterparts.

Have fun starting a garden. Don’t try to create a masterpiece your first year-build up to it. Select a few choice plants that are more expensive. The rest can be less expensive, smaller complementary plants to round out your garden. Gardening is our nation’s number one leisure activity so go out and have a good time in your own piece of earth!

Indoor Hydroponic Gardening

Sunday, September 12th, 2010

Hydroponic gardening, (from the Greek words hydro, water and ponos, labor) is a method of growing plants using mineral nutrient solutions, in water, without soil. Terrestrial plants may be grown with their roots in the mineral nutrient solution only or in an inert medium, such as perlite, gravel, mineral wool, or coconut husk.

In the 19th century, researchers discovered that plants absorb essential mineral nutrients as inorganic ions in water. In natural conditions, soil acts as a mineral nutrient reservoir but the soil itself is not essential to plant growth. When the mineral nutrients in the soil dissolve in water, plant roots are able to absorb them. When the required mineral nutrients are introduced into a plant’s water supply artificially, soil is no longer required for the plant to thrive. Almost any terrestrial plant will grow with hydroponics. Hydroponic gardening is also a standard technique in biology research and teaching.

Hydroponic gardening is often defined as “the cultivation of plants in water.” Research has since determined that many different aggregates or media will support plant growth; therefore, the definition of hydroponic gardening has been broadened to read “the cultivation of plants without soil.” Growers all over the world are using hydroponic gardening techniques due to the lack of a large water supply or fertile farmland. Home gardeners have used hydroponic gardening on a smaller scale to grow fresh vegetables year round and to grow plants in smaller spaces, such as an apartment or balcony.

Greenhouses and nurseries grow their plants in a soilless, peat or bark-based growing mix. The nutrients are then applied to the growing mix through the water supply. Therefore, this is also a type of hydroponic gardening. Soilless gardening offers many advantages to the home gardener. Since a sterile medium is used for hydroponic gardening, there are no weeds to remove, and soil-borne pests and diseases are minimized, if not eliminated completely.

Properly grown hydroponic plants also are healthier and more vigorous because all of the necessary growth elements are readily available. The plants can mature faster, yielding an earlier harvest of vegetable and flower crops. Hydroponic gardening uses less space since the roots do not have to spread out in search of food and water. This small space requirement makes hydroponic gardening ideal for home gardeners, and it makes better use of greenhouse space.

The big advantage to hydroponic gardening is the ability to automate the entire system with a timer. Automation reduces the actual time it takes to maintain plant growth requirements. Automation also provides flexibility to the gardener as one can be gone for long periods of time without having to worry about watering the plants.

Hydroponic gardening offers many advantages for commercial agriculture. Cultivating plants without soil eliminates the need for vast farmland and allows crops to be produced in greenhouses or even in the desert sands. Hydroponic gardening techniques also allow for precise water and nutrient application directly to the roots of each plant. Water is reused in these systems and less is lost through evaporation and run-off. Therefore, arid lands, such as deserts, can be transformed into productive lands using limited amounts of water.

Growing plants with hydroponic gardening is not difficult if one understands the basic principles. As long as plant growth requirements are met, there are numerous hydroponic systems that can be used.